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All-Season vs. Touring Tires – What Are The Differences?

If you are in the market for new tires you've undoubtedly seen ads for both all-season and touring tires. So which type of tire do you go with? What is the difference between the two? Hopefully this quick article will make things a bit more clear and help you decide which type is right for your needs.

all season and touring tires

All-Season Tires

The big drawing point with all-season tires is that they are just that…a tire for use in all types of weather and road conditions. The tread is designed to get you through rain, slush and snow, as well as provide adequate handling on dry pavement.

Generally speaking, due to the tread design being made to handle a variety of road conditions, cornering and handling performance will not be quite as good as it will on a touring tire. That said, you will find ultra-high performance all-season tires that cost a bit more, but provide grip and handling that rival more expensive touring or summer performance tires.

Should you choose an all-season tire? It really depends on where you live, what type of vehicle you drive and what kind of performance you are seeking out of a tire. If you live in a climate that sees a lot of rain and seasonal temperature changes, an all-season model may be the best option. The same applies if you are driving a standard everyday type of vehicle to and from work. If you are seeking a tire for highway use or more "spirited" driving, then a touring or sport performance model may be a better choice.

One last tip to keep in mind... an all-season tire does not equal a snow tire. Many people mistakenly believe that the traction and grip on snow and ice will be about the same with an A/S tire as it is with a winter tire. If you live in a part of the country that sees significant snowfall during the winter, a set of snow tires will likely be in order. That said, there are some excellent all-season tires that do a great job for the most part during winter weather driving.

Touring Tires

A touring tire is built to provide not only a more comfortable ride, but increased handling and performance as well. You will notice they generally have a lower profile than their all season counterparts. The tread is usually wider and they have a larger contact patch with the road. The result is a tire that generally has a more "sticky" grip in the corners and rides more quietly and comfortably down the highway.

Wet surface traction is generally much better and overall tread life can be longer for most models. The drawback with a touring tire can be winter weather driving. Unless you have chosen an all-season touring tire, driving on light snow or slush covered roads can be an issue.

So, are touring tires right for you? Again, it depends on your needs, climate and driving habits. Do you want a more quiet and comfortable ride? Then a touring model could be the best choice. Do you live in an area that sees little change in weather conditions or doesn't see much of any snow in the winter? Then this may be the right tire for you. Are you looking for better cornering and handling from your car in both dry or wet surface conditions? A high performance touring tire will be a great option.

Choosing the right style of tire for your vehicle and needs is very important. Making the wrong choice can not only be more expensive on the wallet, but you will also not enjoy driving your vehicle like you should. Our site can help you make the right choice in tires by giving you the Top 10 tire models in both All-Season and Touring Tires. Of course, if you are unsure if a particular tire is the best for your vehicle, you can always contact us and we will try to help you as best as we can.

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by Terry Edwards

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